Week #19 – Robinne Lee – The Idea of You


This weeks blurb breakdown is Robin Lee’s, The Idea of You: The unforgettable and addictive Richard and Judy romance about the man everyone is talking about.

At the time of writing it was No. 6 in the Rockstar Romance category on Amazon UK’s book store.

Here’s the blurb…

A screenshot of the Amazon sales page for Robin Lee's book, The Idea of You
Here’s the Amazon link for a closer look

The breakdown…

Opening: 

THE SCORCHING HOT LOVE AFFAIR ABOUT THE MAN THAT EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT . . .

This opener does two things, first, it signals genre in a way that makes it sound exciting, secondly, it ends on an open loop – who is this man that everyone’s talking about?

‘THIS SLAYED ME’ Taylor Jenkins Reid

‘IF YOU ONLY READ ONE BOOK THIS YEAR, MAKE IT THIS’ 5***** Reader Review

‘SUMMER’S SAUCIEST, SEXIEST READ’ Red

‘THE ENDING . . . I’M NOT OVER IT’ 5***** Reader Review

‘I’M MADLY IN LOVE WITH THIS NOVEL’ Curtis Sittenfeld 

THE RICHARD & JUDY BOOK CLUB PICK

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This social proof sandwich mixes reader reviews with a few influencers. They use bold to add emphasis to the reviews and pick out key phrases that poke at our desire buttons. 

They add in another layer with the ‘Richard and Judy’ book club line. It adds credibility and authority, and is a trust builder. People are investing in their time here, they don’t want to waste it on a boring read.  

Then they use a small underline to signify a change in section and indicate where the blurb starts proper. It’s really good for skimmers and improves readability. 

EVERYONE IN THE WORLD KNOWS HIS NAME. BUT IT’S YOU HE WANTS.

Ooh, this is a clever opener. The first sentence is an open loop and repeats the mental image of the opening hook at the top – who the heck is this guy? 

Ah, but then, this line, “But it’s you he wants,” is great because it speaks to our ego’s. Who doesn’t want to feel wanted? They could have written it another way, ‘But he only wants her,’ or ‘But’s there’s only one name on his mind.’ 

Do you see the difference? Because we insert ourselves into the story, we feel those feelings too, and that’s what makes this opening hook so effective. 

To the media, Hayes Campbell is the star of a record-breaking British boyband. 

So here’s the first intro into this guy that everyone’s talking about. They close the loops created in the opening hooks. We’re given his name and we’re told why and how everyone knows his name. It’s not weighed down with extra information.  

To his fans, he’s the naughty-but-nice front man – whose dimples and outlandish dress sense drive them crazy.

Now we’re given a few more snippets about this guy. It’s not over done but just enough to help readers build a mental picture of this guy. 

To Solène Marchand, he’s just the pretty face that’s plastered over every girl’s bedroom wall.

It’s only now that we’re given information about the woman he wants and how she sees him. The phrase ‘just a pretty face’ paints enough of a picture to know she’s not that into him. 

Until a chance meeting throws them together . . .

Now we have the inciting incident positioned as an open loop. We want to know how this goes, how does she end up meeting him?

The attraction is instant. The chemistry is electric. The affair is Solène’s secret.

Good use of the rule of three’s here. Three short sentences of similar length. Paint the picture of this first meeting. The repetition of ‘the’ is also a solid writing technique. The end is clever too because we’re a sucker for secrets!

But how long can it stay that way?

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Here’s the cliffhanger and the only way we can find out the answer is by buying the book. They end this descriptive section with another underline to break up the copy. 

‘This is an addictive, glamourous, escapist page-turner – and pure wish fulfilment for Harry Styles fans’ DAILY RECORD

Praise for The Idea of You . . .

‘Summer’s sauciest, sexiest read. This book has ruined my life and I’m not even mad about it’ RED

‘Sexy enough for the beach, smart enough for the book club’ BOOK CIRCLE

The Idea of You managed to work the ultimate book magic: It blurred the boundary between this world and that one’ OPRAH MAGAZINE

‘You finally have something else to obsess about. Will have you staying up all night to finish’ THE SKIMM

Readers everywhere have fallen for The Idea of You:

‘It’s been over a week since I finished The Idea of You and I still haven’t recovered’ *****

‘The ending … I’M NOT OVER IT’ 5***** READER REVIEW

‘Solene and Hayes … I won’t be forgetting you anytime soon’ *****

‘I can’t remember being so moved by a book before. I mean down to my soul. Every word was pure gold’ 5***** READER REVIEW

‘I purchased copies for my closest girlfriends. One of those books that you never want to end’ *****

‘Impossible to put down’ 5***** READER REVIEW

Here’s the other end of the social proof sandwich. There’s a lot here and I doubt they will all get read. But, they repeat the title – to help make it memorable – and focus on the selling the experience.

Overall, it’s well written blurb.

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